Google will Unveil Own Tablet

ith the ongoing Google I/O developers conference this week will surely come a lot of surprises from the Internet giant, one of which is the anticipated unveiling of a tablet running on their equally new Android operating system, Jellybean. Google seem to be doing what Microsoft did last week in its unveiling of Surface tablet. “It seems Google’s trying to do what Microsoft did last week, which is basically tell their partners they no longer trust them to do things right.” The 7-inch Asus-Google tablets will be made by Quanta Computer and will reportedly run on Jellybean, the latest version of Android’s mobile OS. The first of its kind from Google, the tablet could cost up to USD 250, which should be another reason for Amazon as well as Apple to be on the alert. More »

Google Faces Antitrust Suit in India

Springhill Group Counselling believes it is significant that each of us needs to understand what counselling and psychotherapy is about and what they should anticipate from the procedure of therapy. Nurturing knowledge among community is a significant purpose for every organization. This website has been aims to help people find out more about counselling and psychotherapy, especially those who are considering therapy as an option for themselves or someone else, or for clients who are already involved in therapy. More »

First of its Kind Malware Targets Android

Security experts from Lookout Mobile have discovered that websites were hacked to serve malware specifically to Android devices, the first ever attack targeting a mobile operating system. The virus comes up when a user happen to visit a compromised website and disguises itself as a system update. Drive-by downloads such as this have long been a challenge to digital security as it only takes someone to visit an infected site for the malware to infect the vulnerable device. Mobile specialist Springhill Group Counselling reports that the bug, named NotCompatible, appears to be the first Android bug to have spread in that way. More »

IT experts fear Anons

Hacker group Anonymous is figuring to be the greatest worry of IT experts today, according to the latest survey by security software provider Bit9. A new survey conducted by the security company Bit9 called 2012 Cyber Security Survey released on April 23 asked around 2,000 IT experts in Europe and US regarding the present security condition of enterprise Relevant Services/Products. Out of all the respondents, 64% believes that their firms will be attacked during the next 6 months while 61% chose hacktivists as the most likely attackers. Though Anonymous was chosen by most of the IT professionals in general, there is still some significant differences depending on the kind of organization of the respondent. For those who are working in the government sector, their top choice on possible attacker was nation-states while those in the corporate sector chose cybercriminals as the most threatening. More »

11 Suspected of LCD Tech Leak

At least eleven individuals were suspected of selling Samsung’s key technology involved in creating the next generation of flat screen panels to one of its South Korea rival in the TV manufacturing sector. According to authorities, suspects allegedly shared the technology used in Samsung’s flat screen display to another domestic company through their contacts to both of the firms. The 11 suspects are composed of current and former Samsung researchers along with employees of the rival company. More »

 

Depression Can Worsen Knee Pain


http://earlsview.com/2012/07/06/depression-can-worsen-knee-pain/

Treating mental as well as physical health may alleviate symptoms.

By Jennifer Davis

 

3/23/11 Depression could make symptoms of knee osteoarthritis, or OA, feel even worse. In fact, a study published in The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgerysays depression can have just as strong an effect on knee pain as physical damage.

“This was found to be particularly true in patients with radiographic findings of less severe – mild to moderate – knee osteoarthritis,” says lead author Tae Kyun Kim, MD, PhD, director of the division of knee surgery and sports medicine at the Joint Reconstruction Center at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital in South Korea.

Dr. Kim’s research team studied data taken between 2005 and 2006 from 660 Korean men and women older than age of 65. They measured the severity of participant’s OA damage with X-rays, questioned patients about their pain and interviewed them to diagnose depressive disorders. Those with the most joint damage reported feeling the most pain, but more surprising was that patients with mild to moderate knee OA who were experiencing depression also reported severe pain, even if X-rays didn’t show the significant damage that typically indicates pain.

“Pain is a complex phenomenon which is influenced by many factors, including several physical and psychological factors,” Dr. Kim explains. “Concurrent pain and depression have a much greater impact than either disorder alone on multiple domains of functional status.”

Researchers say their findings highlight the need for doctors to be on the lookout for depression in their knee OA patients.

“We believe that one simple and practical option for an orthopeadic clinic would be to establish a consultation system with relevant psychiatrists who can identify and treat depression, if found, in patients who continue to complain of severe symptoms that are discordant with the radiographic severity of knee osteoarthritis and who do not respond to treatment modalities,” Dr. Kim suggests.

Jon T. Giles, MD, an assistant professor of medicine at Columbia University and rheumatologist at New York Presbyterian Hospital in New York City, says this study adds further weight to the existing medical literature highlighting the effect of psychosocial issues on pain responses.

“Painful sensations are relayed through the brain in a very complex way, and can be modulated up or down,” he says. With stress, poor sleep, anxiety and depression, which are known to influence pain levels, “stimuli feel more painful than they would in someone without the adverse psychosocial factors. This probably explains in part why the largest effect of depression in the study was seen in those without much OA to see on X-rays.”

Because depression might amplify pain responses in OA and other musculoskeletal conditions, Dr. Giles says, clinicians should use antidepressants and other treatments if necessary to alter mood, rather than just prescribing medications designed to block pain.

“Antidepressant medications have been found to have analgesic as well as antidepressant effects,” agrees Dr. Kim.

Dr. Giles says it’s also important for caregivers who treat musculoskeletal conditions to screen patients for potential psychological aggravators of pain and refer them for treatment when needed.