Google will Unveil Own Tablet

ith the ongoing Google I/O developers conference this week will surely come a lot of surprises from the Internet giant, one of which is the anticipated unveiling of a tablet running on their equally new Android operating system, Jellybean. Google seem to be doing what Microsoft did last week in its unveiling of Surface tablet. “It seems Google’s trying to do what Microsoft did last week, which is basically tell their partners they no longer trust them to do things right.” The 7-inch Asus-Google tablets will be made by Quanta Computer and will reportedly run on Jellybean, the latest version of Android’s mobile OS. The first of its kind from Google, the tablet could cost up to USD 250, which should be another reason for Amazon as well as Apple to be on the alert. More »

Google Faces Antitrust Suit in India

Springhill Group Counselling believes it is significant that each of us needs to understand what counselling and psychotherapy is about and what they should anticipate from the procedure of therapy. Nurturing knowledge among community is a significant purpose for every organization. This website has been aims to help people find out more about counselling and psychotherapy, especially those who are considering therapy as an option for themselves or someone else, or for clients who are already involved in therapy. More »

First of its Kind Malware Targets Android

Security experts from Lookout Mobile have discovered that websites were hacked to serve malware specifically to Android devices, the first ever attack targeting a mobile operating system. The virus comes up when a user happen to visit a compromised website and disguises itself as a system update. Drive-by downloads such as this have long been a challenge to digital security as it only takes someone to visit an infected site for the malware to infect the vulnerable device. Mobile specialist Springhill Group Counselling reports that the bug, named NotCompatible, appears to be the first Android bug to have spread in that way. More »

IT experts fear Anons

Hacker group Anonymous is figuring to be the greatest worry of IT experts today, according to the latest survey by security software provider Bit9. A new survey conducted by the security company Bit9 called 2012 Cyber Security Survey released on April 23 asked around 2,000 IT experts in Europe and US regarding the present security condition of enterprise Relevant Services/Products. Out of all the respondents, 64% believes that their firms will be attacked during the next 6 months while 61% chose hacktivists as the most likely attackers. Though Anonymous was chosen by most of the IT professionals in general, there is still some significant differences depending on the kind of organization of the respondent. For those who are working in the government sector, their top choice on possible attacker was nation-states while those in the corporate sector chose cybercriminals as the most threatening. More »

11 Suspected of LCD Tech Leak

At least eleven individuals were suspected of selling Samsung’s key technology involved in creating the next generation of flat screen panels to one of its South Korea rival in the TV manufacturing sector. According to authorities, suspects allegedly shared the technology used in Samsung’s flat screen display to another domestic company through their contacts to both of the firms. The 11 suspects are composed of current and former Samsung researchers along with employees of the rival company. More »

 

Emotional Intelligence May Cause Job Burnout


http://www.goodtherapy.org/blog/emotional-intelligence-cuases-job-burnout/

 

An employee’s job performance is dependent upon many things, includingemotional intelligence (EI). “It has been established that the emotions an employee experiences in their organization affect his/her psychological and physical health, and also that employee’s attitude towards duties, the organization, and work-related accomplishments,” said Tae Won Moon of the Department of Business Administration at Hongik University in Seoul, South Korea, and lead author of a recent study examining EI on the job. Burnout, also termed emotional exhaustion, is a key factor in determining how emotional intelligence affects job performance. “In our study we used the words emotional exhaustion and burnout interchangeably. Burnout includes three distinct states:  emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and diminished personal accomplishment,” said Won Moon. “Among these three states, emotional exhaustion is at the core of burnout.” When an employee is forced to exhibit emotions to customers that are insincere, such as smiling to a customer when having a bad day, causes emotional dissonance. “Researchers have suggested that sustained emotional dissonance reduces an individual’s self-identity or even promotes a strong contrary (pseudo) identity and this leads to feelings of stress, frustration, or burnout/emotional exhaustion,” said Won Moon. High levels of EI are linked to increased coping skills, on and off the job. Therefore, Won Moon theorized that low levels of EI would lead to emotional exhaustion or burnout.

For the study, Won Moon interviewed 295 employees from a South Korean department store. The average age of the participants was 38, and all had been employed for at least one year. The results revealed that three key components ofEI, optimism, social skills and emotional validation, were negatively linked to emotional exhaustion. “We speculate that individuals who are good at utilizing their emotions by incorporating emotion in thought, and understanding emotions by employing emotional knowledge, may be more likely to experience emotional exhaustion,” said Won Moon. “Since they put more effort into making emotional facilitation in thinking, and analyzing their own and others’ emotions, this process may generate a feeling of stress, frustration, or burnout/emotional exhaustion.”

Reference:

Moon, Tae Won, and Won-Moo Hur. “EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE, EMOTIONAL EXHAUSTION, AND JOB PERFORMANCE.” Social Behavior & Personality: An International Journal 39.8 (2011): 1087-096. Print.